10 Tips For Buying a Used Car

Are you fixing to buy a car pretty soon? Before you just run out and make a purchase this big you should read these 10 tips for buying a car first. As a matter of fact you may want to print them off and take them with you. These are some very important tips to remember.

The recession has made things a little bit harder for everyone and the car dealers are trying to squeeze every penny they can out of you. You will want to get the most value for your money that you can.

Buying a car is a very important investment. You should always want to protect your investments the best way you can. You do not want your car to become more of a liability than an asset. If you are not careful that is exactly what can happen.

These 10 tips for buying a car hope to provide you with a little bit of knowledge before you go out and start looking for your dream car. Read through all of these tips and take them into consideration when you are looking at different cars. Whether you are going to buy a new or used car you will want to know all of these great tips to avoid all of the pitfalls to making a huge purchase like this.

Below are the 10 tips to buying a car:

1) There is a “right time” to buy a car whether you know it or not. This is generally when the new models come in. New model cars usually come in between August and November, so by shopping for a car during these months you will be able to have access to the newest model cars available.

2) Do not feel pressured to buy a car. Salesmen always try to make you make a decision to buy now, and will try to persuade you to make an instant decision.

3) Ask salesmen about unadvertised sales that may be going on.

4) The internet is a great place to look for cars! You can sometimes find good deals without wasting your gas or having to deal with any pushy salesmen.

5) Be ready to negotiate the right price for you. Almost everywhere you go a car price is negotiable, so be your own agent and negotiate a price you can afford.

6) Don’t go to car dealerships on the weekend. This is when most people go to the dealership to buy a car, so you won’t get as good of a deal if you do this. Instead go during the middle of the week when salesmen are more eager to make a deal.

7) Go to car dealers toward the end of the month when dealers are trying to meet sales goals.

8) Bring someone with you that is knowledgeable about cars if you are inexperienced.

9) Take your time when making your purchase. Remember this is a major purchase, and you should not be talked into buying something that you do not want.

10) Have Fun!

I hope these 10 tips to buying a car will help you to make a better informed purchase.

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Tips on Buying Mexican Car Insurance Before Your Upcoming Trip

If you are planning on visiting Mexico either for a short trip, or an extended stay, and you will be operating a vehicle in this country; then you may want to consider investing in Mexican car insurance. There are different legal systems in place in Mexico, when compared to the United States; and some significant difference in insurance coverage’s that are offered for drivers. When buying a plan for an upcoming trip to Mexico, it is usually best to purchase a short term policy online before entering the country; to avoid any potential issues.

Research Liability Differences- One of the major differences with car insurance in Mexico compared to the United States is the difference in liability issues between the two countries. According to the civil law in Mexico; there is no liability for any type of emotional distress pain or suffering for those who are in an automobile accident. This means that insurance claims only covers property damage and bodily injury; items that are determined strictly and easily based on their actual cash value. This is important information to know, should you ever be in an accident.

Purchase Separate Legal Aid Coverage- When inside Mexico, there is no liability coverage to pay for your legal defense, should you get in an accident and need to go to court. Typically, there is an option to add legal aid coverage to your policy.

Be Aware of Mexican Accident Laws- When deciding whether or not to get Mexican car insurance; remember, if you are in an accident, the country’s law requires your vehicle to be held within the nation’s borders until all damages are paid off. With this in mind, make sure that your policy will cover the cost of bail, or add an additional coverage first.

Buy a Short Term Policy Online- Don’t wait to purchase auto insurance until you arrive in Mexico, you can purchase short term travel policies online before your trip. While you purchase your online policy; make sure you also purchase a car permit.

Collect the Proper Paperwork First- When you enter into the country, you will legally need to have both Mexican car insurance and a car permit for Mexico, especially once outside the ‘border sector’ of the country. When driving in the country, the insurance claim, title holder and driver all must be owned by the same person. In order to obtain a temporary car permit, you will need your drivers license, registration, ID, major credit card and some type of immigration form.

Consider Auto Insurance Through Your Car Rental Company- Many travelers will decide to rent a car in Mexico after they have crossed the border. Your car rental company will likely be able to offer you high quality coverage. However, if you want to get liability coverage, you will have to get this separately from a licensed provider.

Learn the Difference in Deductibles- Deductibles in the United States are different than deductibles in Mexico. Typically with auto insurance in Mexico, there are two different types of deductibles. First there is the physical damage deductible, that is usually about 2% of the value of the vehicle; with a a minimum of $500. There is also theft deductible that is usually 5% of the vehicle’s value with a minimum of $1,000. With the differences in typically deductibles; it is important for drivers to be well informed of what their deductibles will cover.

Look for Medical Evacuation and Plane Tickets Home- If you are worried about a potential accident impacting your trip; consider adding medical evacuation coverage. This will pay for air or land ambulance services. You can also add coverage to cover the cost of your plane tickets to the US or Canada, should an accident render you unable to leave.

Vehicle Repair- As a visitor to the country of Mexico, drivers will want to find out if they are allowed to repair their vehicle in their home country, whether the US or Canada. Otherwise, those who are in accidents may have to get their repairs done in Mexico. Not all insurance companies offer this service, but some who specialize in travel insurance will have this option.

Auto policies differ from country to country; but as a responsible driver, it is always smart to know your coverage options. If you should find yourself in an accident, you can feel confident knowing that your Mexican auto insurance can help keep you covered. Your insurance policy may have a number that you can call,or you can call Mexico’s version of 911 (066) in case of an accident, for assistance.

Tips on Selling and Buying Cars

Do you have a timeworn, corroded, unwanted car that is just occupying extra space on your property? Maybe you have a worn-out car that you want to dispose of as it should be so that you can get rid of the problems that it is bringing along. There are vast numbers of corporations that will voluntarily take them off your hands and will compensate you with cash in return. No matter what form your car is in, you can get additional money by scrapping your car if you choose a credible company.

Why do you need to sell old car for scrap?

When the car has stretched to the termination of its life and becomes of insignificant or no use, when it has been depreciated and is of diminutive or no worth, these are some of the aspects people will need to scrap their vehicle. The term scrap cars is often used to insist on old or wrecked cars which are abortive in their functionality and are long past their sell by date with respects to performance and dependability.

If your automobile is in this cataloging, then it is easy to discard the vehicle and then you could plan to interchange it with a new model, facilitating you to another time make driving a pleasure. Many individuals get emotionally involved with their timeworn car which makes it tough for them to dispose it off. However, when you think through the surplus maintenance and cost allied with such a car, it soon becomes clear that it is time to sell their old car for scrap. Maintenance for wrenched vehicles prove expensive once you look through all the expenditure of such upkeeps and you will realize that you could be disbursing more on it than the expenses would be for buying a new model.

Apart from this, one of the chief ideas of selling an impaired car is to lessen landfill use. Junkyards execute auto reprocessing and the salvaged parts can be again used to offer worth. When certain rudiments of your car can be recycled and reprocessed, the manufacturing budget will drop and ultimately lower the value of a new car. Furthermore, the industrial waste and air contaminants that are emitted into the surroundings every year in the manufacture of parts will also diminish.

How to go about selling scrap cars in London?

If you are eyeing to dispose of your car in the London or for scrap car collection Essex, there are countless scrap car exclusion services which you can choose from. However, before finalizing an option, you must know the pros and cons of every option available. If you are living in the London, it is desirable to connect with companies that are well acknowledged for providing outstanding service, reasonable price and principled car disposal solutions. If you want to avoid any confusion as to which company is better and which is not, it is advisable to conduct a comprehensive research on the internet regarding such companies.

Don’t Get Fooled: 5 Tips For Buying A Good Used Car

Cape Town – Prices of new cars are exorbitant, at least for some, but that’s not the case for 36 794 fortunate South Africans who registered their new cars in January 2017.

Over the last five years during January, new car sales in SA remained steady around the 35 000 mark and annually, 547 442 units were sold in 2016 compared to 617 648 in 2015. That’s a considerable difference in sales of 11.4% and pundits say it’s unlikely to improve this year.

Buying a used car in SA

According to WesBank, statistics indicated that 38 343 new cars were sold in May 2016 compared to 89 390 used cars which clearly shows new vehicles sales don’t even come close to used cars.

Who doesn’t love the new car smell or the fact that you are the first owner but second-hand cars simply offer better value for money especially feature-for-feature. Used cars are also likely to ease up on your bank balance with a much lower insurance premium than a new car.

On the flip side, there is that niggling feeling of breaking down in a used car and sometimes sellers don’t really help either. Anyone can get an ‘OBD2 code’ reader and shady sellers can clear codes without fixing any problems.

Rest assured, following these simple steps will help you choose your new (used) car carefully without anyone taking advantage of you.

Step 1: Use your head, not your heart

We’ve all been there and know how hard it is not to fall in love with what seems to be a bargain. Whether it’s your dream car as a child or a reminder of your first true love – be smart and make the right call. Used-car dealers thrive on infatuated customers as they are easily convinced and could end up with an absolute dud.

When you’re looking to buy a car, the secret is to search far and wide and here the internet can be extremely helpful. Consider all your options and be careful buying the first car you see. Give yourself a realistic chance of scouting around and to see what’s out there. Use the first three cars as a point of reference to weigh-up all the pros and cons going forward.

Step 2: Avoid exotic cars

If you’re buying a new car, you can buy almost anything you want as the parts are available and the car will be under warranty. Buying an exotic second-hand car is not so easy mainly because no factory warranty exists and any service or maintenance costs are out of your pocket.

A good example is parts for a Toyota Corolla or a VW Golf versus a Renault. An oil filter can cost as little as R60 but for a Renault in excess of R200. This easily escalates when you own a high-performance or exotic car.

It is more than just considering the price of parts though. You also need to find a service station that can confidently maintain your car. If your engine is more complex than that of a fighter jet, expect to pay premium rates.

In terms of performance, you should ask yourself this very important question; ‘If this Golf GTI, Type R or BMW M3 is so good, why are they selling it?’

It may not always be the case but more often than not, high-performance cars are likely to have been pushed to the limit before they are sold. Steer clear of these unless you are knowledgeable about cars, have a decent mechanic and prepared to pay a premium for parts,

Step 3: Read the seller, not the price tag

There is no hiding from subconscious cues unless you’re a trained spy. Watch the seller closely while you talk about the car and walk around the vehicle pointing out parts. Shifty or nervous behaviour is usually a sign that there’s something wrong with the car.

Keep a close eye on the seller’s body language. If they seem uncomfortable just follow your gut and walk away. Rather this than being stuck with a lemon.

I once viewed a great-looking car for sale but the private seller seemed rushed. Fortunately, I had a good mechanic with me and he pointed out a soapy residue in the oil. For those who don’t know, that’s a tell-tale sign of a blown head-gasket which can be very expensive to repair.

Step 4: Thorough inspection is vital

When the seller asks how much you know about cars, act as if you don’t know much. This means they will only focus on the good points of the car which leaves you with a great opportunity to check the things they didn’t mention.

Specifically, check brake discs for uneven wear; the colour of the oil should be golden brown and not a dark colour. Battery terminals should be clean, tyres in good condition with even wear and the body should be straight. Check the body seams in the engine bay and the boot to identify any signs of accident repairs.

Also, give the car a mighty push with the handbrake up. It should of course not move but if it does, you’ve already identified one problem.

When a car is advertised as having a “new” battery, it could mean there is something wrong with the loom or alternator. Realistically, why would someone sell a car and give you a battery worth R1000? Same applies to new tyres. They’re expensive to just ‘giveaway’ so be careful and keep in mind faulty suspension or problems with the steering.

Lastly, look for body panels where the colour seems a different shade. This could be an indication that the car was involved in an accident and a purchase not to complete.

Step 5: Give it a good test drive

Don’t just jump in and get going. Instead, get the seller to switch on the ignition and let the vehicle idle. Test the wipers, lights and listen to the engine noise. Walk around the car and once it’s been idle for a while, switch it off.

Start the car again leaving the headlights on. If it doesn’t start immediately there may be an electrical problem. Check all lights, aircon, radio, electric windows and mirror switches.

During your test drive, be sure to test all the gears and find a decent incline on your route. Feel for any “flat spots” in acceleration as this could indicate ignition or injector issues. Flat spots are where the acceleration stops momentarily and then picks up again.

Listen for strange noises. Some people are just poor drivers and the old saying comes to mind, “If you can’t find it, grind it” so check for grinding sounds when you brake or change gears especially. This may indicate a serious mechanical fault and it’s best to walk away.

High-pitched squealing noises from the V-belts are also unacceptable under any circumstances and another reason to simply walk away. After the test drive check to see if any fluids have leaked onto the ground. Oil or coolant could indicate serious problems with oil seals, engine or the cooling system.

Last on the checklist is to trust your gut. Does the vehicle “feel right” to you? If the answer is yes, it’s time to sign on the dotted line and happy motoring until the next buy.

Tips and Tricks for Buying Your Next Car From a Car Dealer

Whether you are in the market for a brand new $120,000 sportscar or a new-to-you $2,500 commuter, all consumers want a “good deal”. Nearly every dealership will spend thousands of marketing dollars on stressing this fact to you, all before you ever step foot on the asphalt. It is up to you, the informed consumer, to utilize your strengths, minimize your weaknesses, and do the uncomfortable dance to get behind the wheel of your dream vehicle at the best possible price. Following some or all of these pieces of advice will give you the best chance to do just that.

1. There is always a “Big sale and promotion”, but the biggest are at the end of the month.

If you get nothing else out of this article, get this: Do NOT go car shopping outside of the last 5 days of the month. Manufacturers create monthly incentives to attract customers to the dealer’s lots. Normally, these incentives run through the end of the month. However, every dealer (from the dealer principle to the newest salesperson) is trying to sell the most cars possible. As a result, they will be a lot more flexible and eager to earn your business on the 27th, as opposed to the 7th.

2. There is a lot more markup on used cars than new cars.

Don’t expect for the dealer to come off the advertised price on a new vehicle by much at all! What would you guess is the average markup on a new vehicle? $3,000 or maybe ever $5,000? Let’s try negative $256.00. I’m not kidding. Out of a group of 80 franchised dealerships, they lose an average of $256.00 gross by selling this specific model. When looking at used cars, pay attention to any pricing trends. Do you see some common endings, such as $XX,995 or $XX,986? Ask the salesperson in very general terms how long some of these vehicles have been on the lot and you might be surprised what you can learn. Most dealerships shoot to “turn” or sell used vehicles within 45 or 60 days. If the vehicle is older than that, you have quite a bit more leverage.

3. Be polite, seriously!

Everyone has dealer horror stories that they love to tell when they hear that their neighbor or coworker is going to buy a new vehicle. Here is a great piece of advice: if you don’t like the way you are treated at a dealership, then get back in your car and leave! There are good dealerships in your area that have good salespeople. The best part about it: you can get the same price on a new vehicle, since there is so little markup. However, please be polite. Car salesmen are people too. They get their feelings hurt and are simply trying to make a living. If you treat them with the same amount of respect that you hope to receive, you will make the entire buying process better for everyone involved.

Buying a vehicle doesn’t have to be a scary experience. As you start this process next time, please keep in mind these key points. They are guaranteed to help you as you go through this process. Remember, an informed consumer is a powerful consumer. Use all of the tools at your disposal before going to the dealership and be polite once you are there. Most of all, enjoy the car buying process and congratulations on the purchase of your new vehicle!