How to Purchase a Used Automobile: Tips From the Auto Insurance Guys

These days, purchasing a new car requires a lot of money. For those looking for another option due to the financial output, shopping for a used car may be a good bet. Of course, a previously owned car, no matter how sleek and shiny may have hidden disadvantages.

Below find tips from some finely-tuned insurance professionals on how to go about the task of shopping for a used car.

8 Ways to Get a Good Deal on a Previously-Owned Car

• Decide How Much You Can Spend on the Purchase

Prior to shopping around for a good used car, do a personal financial tally. Then focus only on buys you can afford – whether via financing or full payment method.

• Choose the Right Kind of Vehicle

Unmarried people without kids do not need a big car. On the other side of the coin, married folks with children in tow could use a larger car. Recreational drivers, long-distance drivers and city or highway drivers have different needs as well. Assess your individual requirements, then shop for the car that matches them.

• Check Out Prices and Repair Frequency

Look online to determine what you should be paying for car makes and models according to year and usage. This search will also let you know what type of vehicles requires less maintenance work and what type has less mechanical headaches.

• Learn about the Car’s Past

Research a particular car’s history by putting in the Vehicle Information Numbers. This will get you to a full report about past collisions, owners and even recorded maintenance and repair jobs.

• Test the Car out by Taking it for a Spin

Drive your prospective car purchase over a calculated route that includes hills, bumps, curves and highway maneuvering. This way, you’ll get an idea how the overall driving ability is.

• Get a Professional Mechanic’s Opinion

Enlist your favorite mechanic in the decision by hiring him or her to inspect the car for surface problems that a layman like you may not be able to detect.

• Use Your Price-Negotiating Skills

Utilize the knowledge you have gained from all your research on the car to negotiate a price that fairly reflects its true value.

And Last But Surely Not Least

• Don’t Forget About Auto Insurance

Before completing the buying process, speak to an experienced independent insurance agent about insurance for the vehicle. After binding the policy, sign the contract, pay, and you are good to go. No worries about the possibility of no coverage on the road to home!

Now that you have a new (used) automobile take care of it with good maintenance practices and remember to keep driving safety a priority.

Happy driving!

Winter Auto Detailing Tips

The winter season can cause a lot of damage to your car. During the cold winter months, the car’s plastic, glass, tires and paint work are at the mercy of the elements. Before the winter arrives, you can help protect your car with a little protective work. Let’s take a look at a few things to keep your car protected for the winter:

Seal the paint work

A paint sealant like a synthetic wax is a practical option to apply to your car if it is likely to be left exposed to the extreme winter conditions. Use a proper paint sealant to give the desired protection against road salts and water. Many of the modern sealants are very effective at creating a useful barrier to stop oils, chemicals or other contaminants from causing damage to the paint work. A single application of a top-rated paint sealant has the potential to last the entire winter season.

Keep the car clean

Driving on the road in the winter can increase the risk of the car getting chipped or scratches because of the many items of debris on the road. Any deep scratches that are left in the car’s paint work can lead to moisture penetration which will continue to freeze and thaw. Over time this will start to weaken the local paint work and oxidation will start to set in.

A regular car wash is a great way to minimize the risk of paint related oxidation. Also, the entire body of the car should be checked for paint scratches and chips. If any defects in the paint are noted, they can be repaired with a suitable paint sealant.

Treat the leather interior

The cold winter months can have a negative impact on the leather interior of a car. The dry and cold weather is very effective at pulling the moisture from the leather upholstery. The best course of action is to treat the leather before the start of the cold weather arrives. Ideally, it is wise to start the work on the leather before the daytime temperature drops below 50° Fahrenheit. If the treatment is left too late it can be difficult to get the leather to accept the conditioner.

Give the tires protection

Every part of the car has a tough time in the winter. This even applies to the tires, which can benefit from a generous application of a high-quality tire dressing to give a useful barrier against the natural elements. Also, a silicone based tire dressing is a further option for those traveling in snow because it can help to stop the buildup of road salt, ice and snow.

The History of Automotive Repairs – Why We Need Trained Technicians in the Collision Repair Industry

Vehicle History Overview

  • They don't make them like they used to.

The First Cars

  • The first motor cars were nothing more than a buggy and engine (Generally repaired by blacksmiths and carpenters. These cars were very expensive, which only the wealthy could afford)
  • Model T was the first car mass production on an assembly line in 1908 (Ford's Vision was to produce an affordable car the average person could purchase)
  • Model T's came in black only to keep the costs down. (The price came down once the assembly line was streamlined, but in 1908, the cost for a Model T started at $ 825. By 1913 the cost of the car reduced to $ 550)

Cars in the 1960s

Cars were made the same basic way up through the 60s

  • Body Over Frame
  • Rear Wheel Drive (Same concept, but the cars were very big, bulky, and heavy)

Except people in the 60s wanted SPEED! They achieved this with Big Block Motors, which created a lot of Horsepower. (The Birth of Hotrods, Rat Fink, Flames, and Pin Striping).

Cars in the 1970s

  • The government place strict fuel economy and emissions control laws
  • Customers demanded cars with increased fuel economy
  • New laws and customer demands started the automotive explosion of engineering ideas and changes in the automotive industry

Changes to comply with Demands and Laws

  • Smaller bodied cars and smaller engines
  • Aerodynamics (Increase Fuel Mileage)
  • Lighter cars by using different materials and designs
  • More work-hardened areas created during formation of panel (Body Lines)
  • Safety

Construction of Interstate Highways + Higher Speed ​​Limits + More High Performance Cars = Accidents and More

Deaths from Auto Accidents

Federal Laws were passed to regulate safety. These laws included:

  • Installation of seatbelts
  • Safety glass windshields
  • Head restraints
  • In 1979, the first driver side airbag was introduced
  • Airbags are mandatory in motor cars produced after 1990
  • Unibody Torque Boxes: Allow controlled twisting and crushing
  • Crush Zones: Made to collapse during collision (To act as an absorber, absorbing the impact)

Modern Day Cars

  • Carbon Fiber Parts
  • Aluminum Parts
  • More Plastic Parts
  • High Strength Steel
  • Boron Steel
  • Unibody Construction
  • Space Frame Construction
  • Computer
  • Hybrid Cars

Now they even have cars that will tell you when you're lost, where to turn, Parallel Park for you.

Conclusion

While the modern day cars appear to be made cheap and unsafe, they are actually designed to crush or collapse, while transferring the energy around the stronger passenger compartment to protect the passengers from injury.

There is considerably more damage to modern day cars during a collision than the older vehicles, which gives the perception that "they don't make them like they used to". However, in reality the cars are taking the impact instead of the passengers.

The lesson was designed to give you a little history, but to also emphasize that just a hammer, dolly and a few wrenches are not going to repair today's cars. We need highly trained collision repair and automotive technicians to repair today's vehicles.

6 Tips to Buy a Used Car

Have you been thinking of buying a card car? If so, you are not alone. Every year, around 40 million second-hand cars are sold to new buyers. Since there are tons of choices, you will find it hard to choose the best car. Given below is a list of a few important tips to make this challenge a bit easier. Read on.

Set a budget

Typically, if you take out a loan for the car, make sure the payment of the car is not over 20% of your take-home salary. But if you are on a tight budget, try and stick to your budget. Used cars require regular maintenance and replacements. Aside from this, there are some costs that buyers have to take into account, such as insurance and fuel.

Build a List of Used Cars

If you want to save money buying a used car, make sure you take into account multiple brands. As a general rule, it’s a good idea to make a list of 3 to 5 cards that will meet your needs.

If you are planning to get a car that is not older than 5 years, we suggest that you get a certified pre-owned one. These vehicles come with long-term warranties.

Check Prices

Based on where you are going to buy the car, the prices will vary. You can also find them at new-car dealerships, used-car retailers and independent car lots, just to name a few. The cost of the CPO cars is the highest. If you want to have a good idea of what people are paying for the brands you are interested in, we suggest that you look at the average prices of the cars that people are willing to pay in your area.

Read the History Report

If you are buying the vehicle from a friend or family member, you don’t need to worry about the vehicle history report. On the other hand, if you are buying it from someone else, you must read the history report. The report will let you know vital information regarding the vehicle, such as the condition of the odometer. If you want to get this information, you can use the vehicle Identification Number (VIN).

Contact the Seller

Don’t just run out to take a look at the car you have found. What you need to do is make a call to the seller. Actually, you need to establish a good relationship with the seller, which will help you verify the information regarding the vehicle.

If things go as planned, you may want to approach the seller to test drive the vehicle. If possible, drive the vehicle during the day. This way it will be easier for you to check the condition of the car.

Negotiate a Deal

It’s a good idea to negotiate a good deal. Before you negotiate with the seller, make sure you know the maximum amount that you are willing to pay for the car. The opening offer has to be lower than the price you are willing to pay.

So, you may want to follow these tips when buying a used car.

Rust is Both an Automotive and Safety Danger to Your Vehicle

Rust is both a cosmetic and safety danger to your car. Your car can become structurally damaged and dangerous to drive if rust damages important structural and safety components of your car body. Dangerous fumes may seep into the passenger compartments of your car – not good for the health of yourself and your family. Once started rush can flourish and grow becoming very difficult and downright both prohibitive, time consuming and expensive to fix or repair. Your vehicle can and will become unsightly, be greatly reduced in value and difficult to seller trade in for a new vehicle.

What can be done to prevent rust from developing and growing on your car’s metal body? First and foremost it comes down to routine and regular car and maintenance of your vehicle’s exterior body and paint surface. Have your car washed and dried on a very regular and routine basis. Professional car washes with thorough cleaning of dust and debris in the undercarriage and under the fender areas are well worth the cost and efforts. Dust and debris in crevices, that well not being visible, is a major harbored or moisture can leads to the initiation and growth of rust on car metal bodies. If these hidden areas are clean and dry – there is no retained moisture to metal to start this rust process.

Once started the majority of the damage by rust is under the surface. What you see in rust damage appearing on say a fender is only the tip of the iceberg so to speak. Regular and routine washing and thorough drying of your car is the best effort you can do to prevent rust.

Next see if your car can not be garaged and kept out of the elements and rain. If possible purchase a car cover to keep moisture away from your car metal body – even if garaged. This way further rust causing moisture can be kept away from your car’s metal body. A car cover may be of expense but it will be a lot less expensive than a new paint job and as well the cost of rust metal removal and replacement in a competent auto body repair shop.

Of course pay attention to any nicks or surface chips to your car’s metal body.

It seems that certain areas are more prone than others. Pay particular attention to the areas around the doors. Do your best not to chip paint with your keys in the areas around the key locks on the drivers as well as passenger and rear doors. Next ensure that any drain holes in the drivers, passengers and rear doors – in the case of crossover and sport utility hatch back models are open m not covered and clear. Ditto this for the trunk area and its key lock. Next pay particular attention to the front areas of your vehicle. The front areas – grill etc are most prone to damaging stone chips from stones and gravel thrown that are thrown from other cars and trucks. Try staying an additional area back from vehicles when driving especially at highway and turnpike speeds.

It cannot be overstated that if you do spot the start of rust take care to have this dealt with professionally as soon as possible. While what you see of rust , is only the surface component and is only a small portion of the damage , nipped in the bud rust damage can be repaired much more simply, easier and less expensively than if left to grow, expand and fester.

In the end it’s your vehicle to maintain. Prevention and care of rust on your vehicle is not only a matter of physical appearance but also of safety as well as retention of the value and reliability of your automotive vehicle product.